Boeing layoffs hit 8,000 jobs,wheel up aviation

Boeing layoffs hit 8,000 jobs,wheel up aviation

WASHINGTON — The layoffs hit a record 8,066 jobs in the U.S. military aviation industry, according to a Boeing news release Monday.

In response to the layoffs, the Pentagon announced it would not be making any additional aviation hires.

The news release said Boeing was cutting 4,400 jobs, which represents about 20 percent of its workforce in the aerospace and defense industries.

Boeing also announced that its chief financial officer, Tom Stemberg, had been reassigned to a different role.

Stemberg has been with the company since 2003 and was responsible for overseeing Boeing’s financial position, the release said.

Boeer has more than 400 aircraft manufacturing plants in 17 countries.

A Boeing spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

President Barack Obama called the cuts “devastating” and said they were “an affront to the United States and our national security.”

Obama said that while he was aware of the Boeing layoffs, he and his team would not tolerate it.

“These are tough times for America and for Boeing, and we will continue to work to ensure that the company continues to thrive,” Obama said in a statement.

Earlier Monday, the U-2 spy plane program was cancelled amid an investigation by the FBI into the allegations of a coverup in which officials lied about its safety, including about the type of sensors used to detect the plane.

The Air Force said on Monday it was closing the base in Colorado Springs and other facilities in an effort to reduce costs.

It said the Air Force has about 8,500 employees and about 4,500 people who have received job offers, and about 400 positions were open.

While the U2 program was not affected, the Air National Guard, which manages air bases in Oklahoma, Mississippi and Tennessee, said it would close a training center in Oklahoma that it had planned to use for training U-4 spy planes.

After the closure, the military will begin to make other decisions related to the Air-1 program, which had been slated to begin later this year.

This story has been updated.

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